A step closer to a practical atom laser

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Research team supersizes ‘quantum squeezing’ to measure ultrasmall motion Explore further “But there is an uncertainty, since the number passing fluctuates. When the fluctuations are larger than the effect you are looking for, precise measurements are more difficult. For example, if the fluctuations in your signal due to underlying quantum uncertainty is 50 photons per second, and the effect you’re looking for change the number you’re measuring by 10 per second, you won’t see the effect. What we have done is try to get rid of some of that uncertainty.”Johnsson, a scientist at The Australian National University in Canberra, and his coauthor, Simon Haine, believe that one way to reduce the uncertainty associated with measurements in atom lasers is to perform a technique known as “squeezing.” However, creating a squeezing effect can be difficult. Johnsson and Haine have created models to show a way to get a squeezing effect though self-interaction of atoms using technology that exists now. Their findings can be found in “Generating Squeezing in an Atom Laser through Self-Interaction,” which is published in Physical Review Letters.“An atom laser makes use of atoms with special quantum properties rather the photons employed by a normal optical laser,” Johnsson says. “This potentially allows for much more precise measurements, as well as measurements of effects that cannot be seen by an optical laser. Many of the things we do now with optical lasers, we hope to be able to do with atom lasers.” “Right now it is fair to say that an atom laser is more of a research tool,” Johnsson concedes. “But in the 1960s, when optical lasers were first being used, the case was the same. But now there are all sorts of applications. We believe our work will lead to interesting applications for atom lasers.”And one of the steps toward that realization is discovering that squeezing can provide a steadier stream of atoms. “Squeezing allows you to shuffle uncertainty from one quality, such as velocity or motion, to another. You can’t measure both as accurately as you want,” Johnsson explains. “With squeezing, if you want to measure how many particles are passing at a given time, you can measure that more accurately at the expense of making something else — something you don’t care about — less accurate.”Johnsson and Haine’s idea was to find a simpler way to make the squeezing happen. Other scientists have tried to use squeezing with optical lasers, but it is very difficult. “The different properties of atoms actually makes it easier,” Johnsson says. “Photons in a light beam don’t interact with each other. Atoms are constantly bumping into each other. They naturally, through interaction, create the squeezing effect. We were surprised at how easy it works.”But that is where the difficulty begins. “Even though we don’t have to do anything to facilitate the squeezing,” Johnsson points out, “if you let it go on too long, the effect will break down. You have to be able to manipulate them in order to get the atoms in the beam to interact just enough.” The next problem, he continues, will be actually measuring the squeezing effect. “We’ve come up with a scheme that allows us to create an atom laser for precise measurements, and the experiment should be easy to set up. But we need a detector.” Johnsson explains that detecting individual atoms is difficult, and that the biggest challenge will be counting them in order to verify the squeezing effect. He remains optimistic, though. “This is one of the major things the experimentalists in our group want to do in the next couple of years. We could be closer to a better atom laser.”Copyright 2007 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com.center_img “When doing precise measurements of any kind, it is important to be able to count something, such as photons coming by at any given time,” Mattias Johnsson tells PhysOrg.com. Citation: A step closer to a practical atom laser (2007, July 19) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2007-07-closer-atom-laser.htmllast_img read more

Linguists to rethink reason for short words

first_img A link between the length of words and how frequently they are used was first proposed in 1935 by George Kingsley Zipf, a Harvard University linguist and philologist. Zipf’s idea was that people would tend to shorten words they used often, to save time in writing and speaking. The relationship seems intuitive and it seems to apply to many languages with short words such as “the”, “a”, “to”, “and”, “so” (and equivalents in other languages) being frequently used. Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), led by Steven Piantadosi, tested the Zipf relationship by analysing word use in 11 European languages. They analyzed digitized texts for correlations between words by counting how often all pairs of words occurred in sequence. This information was then used to estimate the probability of words occurring after given previous words or sequences of words. They made the assumption that the more predictable a word is, the less information it conveys, and estimated the information content from information theory, which says the information content is proportional to the negative logarithm of the probability of a word occurring.Piantadosi said if the word length is directly related to information content this would make the transmission of information through language more efficient and also make speech and written texts easier to understand. This is because shorter words, carrying less information, would be scattered through the speech, essentially “smoothing out” the information density and delivering the important information at a steady rate.The studies suggest that the short words are in fact the least informative and most predictable words rather than the most often used, and that word length is more closely related to the information the words contain.The paper is soon to be published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). Steven Piantadosi belongs to the PhD program with MIT’s Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences. As long as original version still available, tweaking Twain is OK, professor says Explore further © 2010 PhysOrg.com Citation: Linguists to re-think reason for short words (2011, January 25) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-01-linguists-re-think-short-words.htmlcenter_img (PhysOrg.com) — Linguists have thought for many years the length of words is related to the frequency of use, with short words used more often than long ones. Now researchers in the US have shown the length is more closely related to the amount of information the words carry than their frequency of use. More information: Piantadosi, S. T., et al. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2011). PNAS paper will appear online at dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1012551108 This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Paleoecologists suggest mass extinction due to huge methane release

first_img Global warming led to atmospheric hydrogen sulfide and permian extinction © 2010 PhysOrg.com Explore further (PhysOrg.com) — Micha Ruhl and colleagues from the University of Copenhagen’s Nordic Center for Earth Evolution have published a paper in Science where they contend that the mass extinction that occurred at the end of the Triassic period, was due to a “sudden” increase in the amount of methane in the atmosphere due to the effects of global warning that resulted from the spewing of carbon dioxide from volcanoes. Citation: Paleoecologists suggest mass extinction due to huge methane release (2011, July 22) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-07-paleoecologists-mass-extinction-due-huge.html More information: Atmospheric Carbon Injection Linked to End-Triassic Mass Extinction, Science 22 July 2011: Vol. 333 no. 6041 pp. 430-434 DOI:10.1126/science.1204255ABSTRACTThe end-Triassic mass extinction (~201.4 million years ago), marked by terrestrial ecosystem turnover and up to ~50% loss in marine biodiversity, has been attributed to intensified volcanic activity during the break-up of Pangaea. Here, we present compound-specific carbon-isotope data of long-chain n-alkanes derived from waxes of land plants, showing a ~8.5 per mil negative excursion, coincident with the extinction interval. These data indicate strong carbon-13 depletion of the end-Triassic atmosphere, within only 10,000 to 20,000 years. The magnitude and rate of this carbon-cycle disruption can be explained by the injection of at least ~12 × 103 gigatons of isotopically depleted carbon as methane into the atmosphere. Concurrent vegetation changes reflect strong warming and an enhanced hydrological cycle. Hence, end-Triassic events are robustly linked to methane-derived massive carbon release and associated climate change. Prior to this research, most scientists have believed that the sudden extinction of nearly half of all life forms on the planet was due solely to the emissions from volcanic eruptions that were occurring in what was to become the Atlantic Ocean. Ruhl et al contend that instead, what happened, was that the small amount of atmospheric heating that occurred due to the exhaust from the volcanoes, caused the oceans to warm as well, leading to the melting of ice crystals at the bottom of the sea that were holding on to methane created by the millions of years of decomposing sea life. When the ice crystals melted, methane was released, which in turn caused the planet to warm even more, which led to more methane release in a chain reaction, that Ruhl says, was the real reason for the mass extinction that led to the next phase in world history, the rise of dinosaurs. Ruhl and his team base their assertions on studies they’ve made of the isotopes of carbon in plants (found in what is now the Austrian Alps) that existed during the period before the mass extinction. In so doing they found two different types of carbons and the molecules that were produced during that time frame. After extensive calculations, Ruhl and his team came to the conclusion that some 12,000 gigatons of methane would have had to have been pumped into the atmosphere to account for the differences in the isotopes; something the team believes could only have happened if the methane were to come from the sea floor.This new research, though dire sounding, may or may not have implications for modern Earth. While it is true that humans have pumped significant amounts of carbon into the atmosphere, amounts that are approaching what Ruhl and his team say led to the earlier methane release, it doesn’t necessarily mean we are on the same path, because as Ruhl points out, things are much different today, the very structure of the planet has changed so much that it would be impossible to transfer what might have been learned about events in Earth’s history 200 million years ago, to what is going on today. This wide angle view of the Earth is centered on the Atlantic Ocean between South America and Africa. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Boston Dynamics Atlas shows balance WildCat sprints untethered w Video

first_img © 2013 Phys.org DARPA’s ATLAS robot unveiled (w/ Video) The feat is a tribute to the company’s control system for the robot. The demo shows how Atlas can stay upright using kinematic and load data from its sensors. Commenting on his reaction to seeing Atlas stay balanced despite being hit by the ball, Noel Sharkey, professor of artificial intelligence and robotics at the University of Sheffield, told the BBC it was “an astonishing achievement” and “remarkable feat.” Next on the engineering agenda is to give Atlas an articulated head with stereo cameras and a laser range finder, along with sensate hands capable of using tools. More information: www.bostondynamics.com/index.html Legged Squad Support System (LS3) is a four-legged robot designed to travel 20 miles on rough terrain carrying 400 lbs of load. The video shows field testing at Twentynine Palms, CA. Testing includes rough-terrain mobility, endurance, visually guided following, GPS guided maneuver, and overall reliability. LS3 is being developed by Boston Dynamics with funding from DARPA and the US Marine Corps. The company’s history dates back to when it was a spinoff from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where Marc Raibert and colleagues developed animal-inspired robots. They founded the company in 1992. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further Atlas is part of the DARPA Robotics Challenge Program. The robot is tethered, powered from an off-board, electric power supply. Atlas’ reason for being is to serve as a humanoid robot that will be capable enough to move in outdoor, rough terrain. The limbs need to perform well, to be able to lift, carry and manipulate in rough environments. Atlas was unveiled in July at the company, as a robot that can respond to dangerous emergencies.The video shows the Atlas robot now on rough terrain walking with bent knees and arms stretched, on rubble and rocks, maintaining its balance as it moves along. In another scene, a ball is trying to knock it over as Atlas stands on one foot, maintaining its balance even while standing on one leg and being hit by the ball from the side. WildCat is a four-legged robot being developed to run fast on all types of terrain. So far WildCat has run at about 16 mph on flat terrain using bounding and galloping gaits. The video shows WildCat’s best performance so far. This month, Boston Dynamics also posted a video of its WildCat robot, funded by DARPA and developed for emergency response and aid scenarios, in a public outing beyond and free from indoor treadmills. The big news about WildCat is that, unlike its robotic cousin Cheetah, this quadruped is untethered. Cheetah drew attention for its speed; the robot could run at 28 miles per hour but that was on a treadmill indoors tethered to a power supply. WildCat can sprint and gallop unrestrained at 16 miles per hour outside of the lab. The video shows its capabilities. (Phys.org) —Boston Dynamics, the Waltham, Massachusetts robotics company that receives funds from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), is making more video news. Whether the company turns out videos of intros and updates of robots such as BigDog, or Petman, or Cheetah, its animal- and human-inspired robots promptly make the rounds of dozens of news sites and blogs. The company has made these robots interesting works in progress, as we see them, from development phase to phase, advancing in balance, agility, speed and strength. This month’s video hits from Boston Dynamics show the company’s two tests, for its bipedal Atlas and its quadruped WildCat. Citation: Boston Dynamics: Atlas shows balance; WildCat sprints untethered (w/ Video) (2013, October 8) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-10-boston-dynamics-atlas-wildcat-sprints.htmllast_img read more

Pencil drawing of a sensor actually is a sensor

first_img More information: Ting-Kuo Kang. “Tunable piezoresistive sensors based on pencil-on-paper.” Applied Physics Letters 104, 073117 (2014). DOI: 10.1063/1.4866440 Using graphite pencils to draw on regular paper, researchers can make some very inexpensive piezoresistive (PZR) sensors. Due to the piezoresistive effect, a sensor’s resistance changes under an applied strain, allowing it to sense mechanical stress and pressure. The first of these pencil-on-paper PZR sensors was fabricated a few years ago as an alternative to silicon PZR sensors, which are costly and require sophisticated fabrication processes. Explore further © 2014 Phys.org. All rights reserved. A pencil-on-paper PZR sensor with an integrated circuit for measuring the sensor’s voltage change under an applied stress. Credit: Kang ©2014 AIP Publishing Journal information: Applied Physics Letters “PZR sensors can be drawn by anyone with a graphite pencil and paper,” Ting-Kuo Kang, a researcher at Cheng Shiu University in Kaohsiung City, Taiwan, told Phys.org. Although graphite PZR sensors are much easier to fabricate than silicon ones, they generally are not as sensitive because graphite’s electrical properties are not as good as those of silicon. In a new study published in Applied Physics Letters, Kang has further investigated the underlying mechanisms of graphite’s PZR properties and improved the sensitivity of graphite-based PZR sensors.PZR sensitivity is characterized by the gauge factor (GF), which is defined as the ratio of the change in electrical resistance to the applied strain. While silicon PZR sensors have GFs above 100, the GFs of graphite PZR sensors are in the single digits.In experiments, Kang used 12 different grades of graphite pencils to draw U-shaped PZR sensors on paper. The pencils are graded by their ratio of graphite to clay. Grades ranged from 9B to 2H, where H denotes the hardness caused by the pencil’s clay content, and B denotes the blackness due to the graphite content. center_img The sensors were drawn on paper that was placed on an electric scale in order to measure and maintain a consistent drawing force for each pencil-drawn sensor. The drawings were then glued on printed circuit board (PCB) strips, and a strain gauge mounted on each PCB strip. Then Kang applied cycles of stress to the sensor using a four-point bending technique, and measured the sensor’s voltage change under the applied stress through an electric circuit. He found that different pencil grades produce different GF values, and therefore different PZR sensitivities. Specifically, the higher the ratio of clay to graphite, the greater the change in resistance under the applied stress, and the greater the GF. Kang explains that these differences can be attributed to variations in the initial tunneling distances between neighboring graphite, with an increase in tunneling distance corresponding to an increase in GF.”The graphite tunneling effect is from one graphite through the insulator of clay to another graphite,” Kang said. “The tunneling structure looks like a metal-insulator-metal.”Currently, PZR sensors made of silicon are used as pressure sensors, accelerometers, and biological sensors, among other applications. As the sensitivity of pencil-drawn graphite PZR sensors continues to improve, they may also be used for these applications. Kang also plans to develop flexible and disposable sensor applications using pencil-on-paper techniques. Citation: Pencil drawing of a sensor actually is a sensor (2014, February 28) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-02-pencil-sensor.html Relationship between relative resistance and applied stress for drawings with different grades of pencils. The differences stem from variations in the initial tunneling distances between neighboring graphite. Credit: Kang ©2014 AIP Publishing Noting tech needs, mining companies seek graphite This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

MIT professor creates reality TV series of his daily life

first_img Major cities must unite against climate change: Paris mayor © 2017 Phys.org Citation: MIT professor creates reality TV series of his daily life (2017, March 27) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-03-mit-professor-reality-tv-series.html Shot from In My Shoes. Credit: Cesar Hidalgo (Phys.org)—”What if the Kardashians were physicists?” asks César Hidalgo, an associate professor at MIT and director of the Collective Learning group at the MIT Media Lab.center_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Fortunately they’re not, but that odd-sounding blend might be the best way to imagine Hidalgo’s new project: a video series called “In My Shoes” that documents his professional life as a researcher and his personal life as a husband and father of a young daughter. The final product—eight episodes ranging in length from 10 to 20 minutes—can be viewed at https://www.inmyshoes.info. “The goal of the series is to help show younger people considering an academic career what the day-to-day of the life of a scholar is like,” he said. “Personally, I think that this would have been very useful to me 20 years ago, when I was considering an academic career but had no role models in Chile.”Hidalgo self-recorded his life over the course of three months in 2016. During that time, he traveled extensively—from Boston to Washington, D.C.; Saudi Arabia; Switzerland; Portland; Monterrey; and Paris. One of the major projects that Hidalgo was working on at the time was DataUSA, a website that presents all kinds of data (economic, demographic, health, education, housing, etc.) in a visual, rapidly digestible way. It’s intended to provide information for policymakers, business owners, students, and job-seekers.The video series, however, is not intended to inform us of the technical details of such projects. Instead we get an inside look at what’s it like to actually be the person developing and sharing these projects, complete with all of the thoughts and concerns that any ordinary person would have. Hidalgo’s narration is thoughtful, entertaining, modest, and—when it comes to what jet lag feels like after 24 hours of travel—painfully sincere. It’s a unique and personal perspective of the academic life that breaks down the traditional stereotypes—especially as we learn that even MIT professors find it challenging to dress a two-year-old in the morning. Explore furtherlast_img read more

Study suggests darkcolored wing feathers may help birds fly more efficiently

first_img Explore further Credit: CC0 Public Domain Flying without wings: Losing feathers has a detrimental effect on migrating birds Humans have been studying birds and other flying creatures likely since the time they could think. In a new study, researchers wondered if the color of a bird had any impact on flying efficiency. To find out, they collected several stuffed samples and brought them to their lab for study.The experiments consisted of putting stuffed wings in a wind tunnel, heating them with infrared lights and then testing them to see what happened. They were most interested in soaring birds such as back-blacked gulls, gannets and osprey. They tested samples of each under various wind conditions to see if wing color had an impact on flying efficiency. Notably, soaring birds can at times gain altitude without even flapping their wings due to undercurrents.The researchers report that dark feathers grew hotter than lighter colored feathers and they also gained heat faster than lighter colors. But it was birds that had white or light-colored wing feathers near their bodies and dark or black feathers on the rest of their wings that saw a real benefit. The researchers found temperature differences as great as nine degrees between black and white feathers on the same wings—enough to create a convection current in the air just over the wing, moving from the bird’s body outward along the wing. They noted that this boosted airflow, which, they assumed, made flying more efficient. The researchers plan to continue studying this effect in birds, hoping to determine just how much of an increase in lift the birds actually get from their color differences—and if there are differences in drag. Citation: Study suggests dark-colored wing feathers may help birds fly more efficiently (2019, July 25) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-07-dark-colored-wing-feathers-birds-efficiently.html More information: Svana Rogalla et al. Hot wings: thermal impacts of wing coloration on surface temperature during bird flight, Journal of The Royal Society Interface (2019). DOI: 10.1098/rsif.2019.0032center_img © 2019 Science X Network This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. A team of researchers at the University of Ghent has found evidence that suggests birds with white wing feathers close to the body and black wing tips get increased lift from their wing colors. In their paper published in Journal of the Royal Society Interface, the group describes their study of wing color in several species of birds and what they found. Journal information: Journal of the Royal Society Interfacelast_img read more

Capturing more than 50 shades of a woman

There is no better muse to an artist than a woman. Her many shades and complexities make for excellent art work and Italian artist Patrizia Maimouna Guerresi’s exhibition Inner Space explores women who have been marginalised by society. But that’s not all the exhibition is about. ‘The images I will present at the exhibition are timeless, rigorous, and classic. They do not depict ancient India or a new India in constant development. They are the inner representations of a greater Indian spirituality,’ said Guerresi. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’The artiste also said that through her work she wanted to highlight the many different societies co-existing in unity.Guerresi is an Italian photographer, sculptor and video installation artiste who has been involved for over 20 years in empowering women and bringing together individuals and cultures in an appreciation for a context of shared humanity far beyond the borders.After exhibiting across Europe and Middle-East, she will be exhibiting her first solo exhibition in India with Tasveer. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixHer art is inspired by her own personal experience and the cultural contexts she has witnessed. The universal myths, the sacred realm, and the female condition, all of which are the vital expressions of the human form, form an intergral part of her work. Through her photography and videography of silent, austere and veiled women in domestic scenes and individual poses, she attempts not only to show and express the angst but sometimes provokes a strong reaction. Her work can be termed both metaphorical and also thought provoking.Women dressed in white, enveloped in chadors, [full-body-length semicircle of fabric that is open down the front] fixed within their own tradition and isolated from and by it in the contemporary world is yet another example of her fascinating work that will be displayed. If you feel you need to understand the many complexities of women, then you should definitely be at the exhibition.DETAILAt: Italian Cultural Centre, 50-E, Chandragupta Marg, Chanakya Puri, New DelhiWhen: 18 TO 27 October Timings: 11 am – 7 pm read more

Acting up on city stage

first_imgFigure theatre or puppet theatre as it is commonly known in Europe has been quite popular in Japan as object theatre. This figure art is now coming to five major cities in India and is being brought by the Japan Foundation. The Noriyuki Sawa Puppet Theatre India Tour 2012 will showcase performances on Japanese folktales. Object theatre is a  new form of theatre where people and puppets perform together on stage with equal stage presence.  Noriyuki Sawa is a contemporary puppet theatre performer who studied figure theatre at the Czech national Academy of Performing Arts in Prague and  continued to perform in collaboration with numerous leading theatres such as DRAK from his base in the Czech Republic. Some of the performances that will be enacted in the Capital includes The Legend of Forest, Star, Fish, Sky and seed. So we say its time for the Capital to gear up for a new kind of theatre.DETAILAt: Chinmaya Mission, Lodhi Road When: 10 and 11December Timings: 6.30 pmlast_img read more

Is NATO close to winding up long Afghan innings

first_imgThe American and British flags were lowered and folded up for the final time at the regional headquarters of the international military, 13 years after the toppling of the Taliban’s radical Islamist regime launched America’s longest war.  The timing of the troops’ withdrawal from the base in the strategic province of Helmand was not released for security reasons. However, according to earlier reports, the ‘longest war in American history’ will last at least another decade, as per the conditions of a garrisoning deal for US forces signed by the new Afghanistan government late last month.The deal guarantees that US and NATO troops will not have to withdraw by year’s end, and permits their stay ‘until the end of 2024 and beyond.’ Also Read – Need to understand why law graduate’s natural choice is not legal profession: CJIBut the current wrap-ups hold high symbolic currency. Camp Leatherneck is the largest US base to be handed over to Afghan control as the coalition ends its combat mission at the end of the year, leaving most of the fight against a resilient Taliban insurgency to Afghan army and police.  British forces transferred the adjacent Camp Bastion at the same time. Once a teeming compound of some 40,000 personnel, the coalition’s Regional Command (Southwest) combined base on Sunday resembled a dust-swept, well-fortified ghost town. Also Read – Health remains key challenge in India’s development: KovindConcrete blast walls and razor wire were left guarding empty sand lots and barracks. Offices were bare, and bulletin boards stripped of photo tributes of fallen American troops.  The most recent official estimate of combined international troops at the base was 4,500 – and those last few will be gone soon, officials said. After the withdrawal, the Afghan National Army’s 215th Corps will be headquartered at the 6,500-acre base, leaving almost no foreign military presence in Helmand.last_img read more

Recipient Moumita dies of infection

first_imgKolkata: Organ recipient Moumita Chakraborty died at SSKM hospital in the wee hours of Monday, three days after a kidney transplant. According to hospital sources, Chakraborty, a resident of Khardah, died at around 2.45 am after her body developed ‘transplant rejection’, a spokesperson from the state Health department said.The woman was kept in ventilation since August 17 after the kidney transplant and her condition gradually deteriorated. It may be mentioned that Chakraborty was one of the recipients of the organs donated by 15-year-old Mallika Majumder, who was declared brain-dead by the SSKM Hospital authorities on August 17. Majumder’s two kidneys and the liver were transplanted on three recipients. Among the three, Chakraborty had undergone a kidney transplant and was admitted to the hospital for her renal problems since the first week of August. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeThe second kidney and her liver were transplanted on two other patients on August 17-18. Sanjib Das of Sodepur in North 24-Parganas received the second kidney. He is presently normal but has been kept under observation. Though he has caught cold, necessary measures have been taken in this regard.”Ajay Nayek from Hyderabad, who has undergone a liver transplant at Apollo Gleneagles Hospitals, is stable now,” the spokesperson maintained.Besides the three organs, Majumder’s cornea was implanted on a blind patient, while her skin was grafted and is being preserved at SSKM’s skin bank. Her heart was found to be clinically unfit for transplantation. Majumder was diagnosed with a space-occupying lesion in the brain after being admitted to the hospital on July 23 and slipped into a coma on August 14. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killedState Tourism minister Goutam Deb visited Majumder’s residence to pay last respects and meet her family members. “This is indeed asad moment but she will be remembered by all for her heroic deed. I am here on behalf of our Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee to pay our last respects. We will always be there for her family and are proud of her,” stated Deb.Mallika’s father Manik, a driver at a courier service company, believes his daughter will continue to live in those who received her organs.last_img read more

Cinnamon helps to cool stomach

first_imgCinnamon just not enhances taste but significantly contributes in improving health by cooling the body by up to two degrees, according to research. The research published in the journal Scientific Reports said that the investigators used pigs for the study and found that cinnamon maintained the integrity of the stomach wall.“When pigs feed at room temperature, carbon dioxide (CO2) gas increases in their stomach. Cinnamon in their food reduces this gas by decreasing the secretion of gastric acid and pepsin from the stomach walls, which in turn cools the pigs’ stomachs during digestion,” said Kourosh Kalantar-zadeh, Professor at the RMIT’s School of Engineering. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfThe researchers have developed swallowable gas sensor capsules or smart pills which the by-product of digestion and could provide valuable insights into the functioning and health of the gut.“Our experiments with pigs and cinnamon show how swallowable gas sensor capsules can help provide new physiological information that will improve our understanding of diet or medicine. They are a highly reliable device for monitoring and diagnosing gastrointestinal disorders,” Kalantar-zadeh added.last_img read more

Its time to get on the hoop trend

first_imgTrends may come and go, but the hoop earrings have become a must have in every girls jewellery box. From patterned hoops to charm hoops, there are different styles of hoops to play with, here’s how: Diamond hoops: Diamonds add an element of bling to any fine jewellery, and the classic gold hoops are no exception. These elegant circlets scream opulence in an understated manner and are a must have for any special occasion, traditional or otherwise. Glam up the classic ‘little black dress’ or even a traditional chiffon saree with a pair of diamond dazzlers. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfPatterned hoops: A style that’s a confluence of the modern and ancient, patterned hoop earrings are a great option for young fashionistas looking to accessorise a ‘desi’ outfit. Choose from an expansive array of patterns that are either engraved on or crafted around the hoop to celebrate your individual style.Hoop jhumkas: Jhumkas are one traditional design that has transitioned exceptionally well from the old world. Hoop jhumkas, a recent update to this classic design, are the perfect blend of traditional and contemporary style and just right for an evening function. Add a statement pair to a heavy lehenga and choli combination, to dazzle in the gathering. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveSlim hoop earrings: Comfortable, classy and chic, slim hoops have always been a saviour to all. Couple your pair with trousers and a crisp white shirt, for effortless everyday style. Classy and feminine, slim hoop earrings add a much needed dash of glamour to an otherwise Plain Jane outfit.Charm hoops: Channel your inner hippie with fun charm hoop earrings, designed to add a touch of quirk to your personal style. Accessorise that plain palazzo and kurta set, or a maxi with a pair of charm hoops earrings and make a subtle yet stand out statement.last_img read more

Babies exposed to stimulation get brain boost

first_imgEarly stimulation helps give a boost to the brains of babies, according to a new study which contradicts the belief that children’s development is determined by their genes and could not be influenced.Researchers from Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) in Norway used advanced electroencephalogram (EEG) technology for many years to study the brain activity of hundreds of babies.The results show that the neurons in the brains of young children quickly increase in both number and specialisation as the baby learns new skills and becomes more mobile. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfNeurons in very young children form up to a thousand new connections per second. The research also shows that the development of our brain, sensory perception and motor skills happen in sync and that even the smallest babies must be challenged and stimulated at their level from birth onward.Babies need to engage their entire body and senses by exploring their world and different materials, both indoors and out and in all types of weather.The researchers emphasise that the experiences must be self-produced; it is not enough for children merely to be carried or pushed in a stroller. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsive“Many people believe that children up to three years old only need cuddles and nappy changes, but studies show that rats raised in cages have less dendritic branching in the brain than rats raised in an environment with climbing and hiding places and tunnels,” said Audrey van der Meer, professor at NTNU.“Research also shows that children born into cultures where early stimulation is considered important, develop earlier than Western children do,” said van der Meer. She said that the brains of young children are very malleable and can therefore adapt to what is happening around them.If the new synapses that are formed in the brain are not being used, they disappear as the child grows up and the brain loses some of its plasticity.Van der Meer mentions the fact why Chinese babies hear a difference between the R and L sounds when they are four months old, but not when they get older.Since Chinese children do not need to distinguish between these sounds to learn their mother tongue, the brain synapses that carry this knowledge disappear when they are not used.Babies actually manage to distinguish between the sounds of any language in the world when they are four months old, but by the time they are eight months old they have lost this ability, according to van der Meer.Since a lot is happening in the brain during the first years of life, van der Meer says that it is easier to promote learning and prevent problems when children are very young.last_img read more

Indian Museum to introduce online ticket booking facility

first_imgKolkata: People visiting the Indian Museum here will no longer have to wait in queues as a new online facility for booking tickets will be introduced next year, its director Rajesh Purohit said. The new system will be inaugurated in January, enabling a prospective visitor to buy tickets, along with souvenir items, from indianmuseumkolkata.org site, he said on Wednesday. “The e-transaction facility will be our new year gift to the visitors. People visiting the site can also choose from an array of souvenir items and museum publications,” Purohit said. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal life Earlier, too, the museum, one of the oldest and largest in south west Asia, has taken initiatives to go online with its repository. “Last September, six per cent of 14,383 objects in the Arts section were put on display online, some dating back to the 4th millennium BC. The objects included pots, earthen vases and female figurines,” the museum director said. The objective is to reach out to historians, archivists and other interested people in every nook and corner of the world, he said. “We have lined up a slew of initiatives in the coming days. Our primary motive is to connect and collaborate with historians, teachers as well as common people,” Purohit added.last_img read more

Kolkata Book Fair to celebrate IndoFrench relationship

first_imgHere is a great news for bibliophiles as an end of this January will bring in the 42nd edition of Kolkata International Book Fair. A 10 member French literary delegation, headed by French cultural Minister Francoise Nyssem, will be attending the fair. The announcement was made by French ambassador Alexandre Zeigler, during a press conference held at Press Club of India. The fair, which is one of the largest around the world, will commence on January 31 and will last till February 11, at the Salt Lake Central Park. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfSpeaking at the conference, Ambassador Zeigler mentioned that noted French novelists, poets, and translators are coming for the Kolkata Book Fair. Also, Tridib Kumar Chatterjee, General Secretary of the book fair said that it’s the first time they had organised joint sessions of noted writers, intellectual of West Bengal and of other parts of the country along with the visiting French literary delegation.Kolkata Book fair is recognised by International Publisher Association of Geneva. Chatterjee stated that last year 22 lacs people attended the fair. But organisers are expecting more book lovers to attend the fair this time. For this state government has made elaborate arrangement for transportation. More than 175 special bus service will be running from different corners of the city. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveProviding further information, Chatterjee said that during the Book Fair, highest order of merit- the legion of honour – will be conferred to the legendary film actor Soumitra Chatterjee by the French minister of Culture. The fair will be inaugurated by the eminent French author Leonora Miano along with the chief minister of West Bengal, in presence of the French minister, on January 30 at 5-30 pm. The closing ceremony will be of Bonjour India festival which is unique in nature. The 5th edition of Kolkata Literature festival –an integral part of the International book fair – will be held at the auditorium of the fair ground for three days, starting from February 10. Many writers from abroad will participate in this festival as told by the Director of the KLF Sujata Sen. As in the previous years, a lucky draw will be held during throughout and the winners will get gift vouchers to purchase books. The grand finale will be organised on the last day of the Fair and the winner will get a new car. The main roads of the book fair will be named after legends of France in celebration of the 70th year of Indo-French relationship. Celebration of the 70th year of Indo-French relationship.last_img read more

People will decide who is an opportunist says Trivedi on Arjun Singh

first_imgKolkata: Taking a dig at Arjun Singh who joined the BJP on Thursday, Trinamool Congress MP Dinesh Trivedi said people will decide “who is an opportunist”. “I wish him all the best. People have their faith in Mamata Banerjee and they want her to play a bigger national role,” he said. Bengal’s ruling Trinamool Congress strongman and Bhatpara MLA Arjun Singh had joined the saffron party in New Delhi on Thursday afternoon, in the presence of senior BJP party leaders. Also Read – Bose & Gandhi: More similar than apart, says Sugata BoseThe legislator was miffed with the Trinamool leadership as he was denied a Lok Sabha ticket from the Barrackpore parliamentary constituency, presently represented by Trivedi. Singh is likely to be fielded from the Barrackpore parliamentary constituency as the BJP candidate. Asked about the same, Trivedi said: “In democracy, they can give him ticket. But people will decide who is an opportunist and who is not.”last_img read more

CBI grills Mirza named in Narada sting

first_imgKolkata: The Central Bureau of Investigation (CBI) has interrogated suspended IPS officer Syed Md. Hussain Mirza on Thursday in connection with the Narada sting operation case. He was interrogated earlier but due some ambiguities found in his statement, he was summoned again.On Thursday, the 2004 batch IPS officer was grilled for almost seven hours by the CBI sleuths. According to sources, he was questioned again why he had taken the money from Mathew Samuels. He was also asked if he had taken the money on behalf of someone else. Also Read – Rs 13,000 crore investment to provide 2 lakh jobs: MamataAccording to CBI sources, he had cooperated with the sleuths while recording of his statement on Thursday. He was repeatedly asked about a former Member of Parliament (MP) who had later joined BJP, as Mirza was known to be close to the MP before he was suspended. The former MP was seen in the footage saying that the Superintendent of Police (SP), Burdwan received the money. But he had not made it clear on whose behalf the then Burdwan SP Mirza received the money. Previously, Mirza had been interrogated by both CBI and Enforcement Directorate (ED) in connection with the Narada case. It has been alleged that he was seen receiving money in the footage, sitting at the Burdwan SP’s bungalow. Sources have informed that he may be called again if needed by the CBI.last_img read more

For the sheer love of fashion and travel

first_img‘Once upon a Time in Aqua’ – summer festive fashion presentation depicting designer Pranay Baidya’s love for fashion and travel, was held in Kolkata on February 13.The showcase was organised in association with The Park, in the presence of eminent personalities like Tiffany Anderson, Chinni Dragon, Diana Trellor, Corina Poppa, Alexey Idamkin, Fabrice Placon, Jürgen Thomas, Micheal Fiener, Carmen Espinoza, Venus Asawapoom, Dhruv Bhalla, Pradeep Khemka, Nayantara Pal Chowdhury, Nilanjana and Srinjoy Bose, Nilufer Archmant, Shaheb Bhattacherjee, and Koneenica Banshyopadhayay. Also Read – Add new books to your shelf”My wanderlust and gypsy-soul has always inspired the fashion I craft,” said Pranay while speaking on the occasion. In keeping with iconic love stories, the presentation was divided into three dedicated chapters. First one titled ‘From Bankura to Sicily’ had textiles which were lovingly hand printed by skilled artisans offering an alternative to mass produced fast fashion. Also, it aimed at keeping alive the dying art of hand block and silk screen printing in this age of digital printing. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveThe capsule collection featured a bohemian mix of shirt dresses, ruffled maxi dresses and tunics in Sicilian hues of pistachio green, blossom pink, lemon yellow, grotto blue, coral red and marsala. ‘Wanderlust’ Mens Celebration wear – A range of contemporary ethnic-wear separates celebrating equal love, and the belief that in the end love always wins. “The idea is to curate a collection which is impactful yet easy to wear and sparks a dialogue,” mentioned the designer. ‘Inspired by India’ – Womens and Men’s Celebration wear was the third chapter showcasing artisanal printmaking on the lehengas, skirts, sarees and menswear, inspired by mughal miniatures and their exquisite filigree architecture. The showstoppers, Mrs India International Richa Sharma dazzled in an intricately embroidered nude peach Mughal garden inspired organza Lehenga and Amrapali Jewels. Ace directors Nandita Roy was a vision of elegance in a tussar-georgette Benarasi Saree with intricate Pasha motifs woven in Antique gold thread, and Shiboprasad Mukherjee in a Royal Blue Chanderi embroidered kurta ensemble stole all the limelight. The evening witnessed Aqua at The Park transformed into a multilevel destination with models sashaying up to the glass facades encompassing the poolside, brilliantly curated by choreographer and makeup artist Rajat – Kaushik.last_img read more

Capital hosts 34th Delhi Horse Show

first_imgThe Delhi Horse Show has been in existence since the early 20th century.The 34th edition of the country’s premier horse show has been organised from March 29 till April 7, 2019, at the Army Equestrian Centre, Delhi Cantt by Army Polo and Riding Centre along with 61 Cavalry under the aegis of Equestrian Federation of India. The Show of this magnitude attracts the largest participants in horses and some of the best riders in the country and is a stepping stone for the next generation of riders. Over 400 horses and 500 riders are participating in the show, which include teams and contingents those form the defence, paramilitary police forces, riding clubs, institutions, to name a few. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfThe Army Equestrian Center which is one of the premier equestrian facilities in the world is an impressive facility which caters to all the different equestrian disciplines. The Center also hosted the 1982 Asian Games for eventing, where India won its first gold of the Games. Since then, it has been the congregating ground of some of the country’s best riders. Over the years, the show has proved to be a great opportunity for people to come and witness great competition and fun activities.last_img read more