Tata Sons Gets Rs 11000 Crore Dividend Boost From TCS

first_imgA massive dividend announced by India’s second largest software firm Tata Consultancy Services (TCS) for fiscal year ending March 2015 seems to give much needed financial cushion for the parent company, Tata Sons.The record dividend payment will help Tata Group chairman Cyrus Mistry to fulfil financial obligations in cash-strapped units of the $103-billion conglomerate.The Mumbai-based software major TCS handed out a dividend of ₹15,474 crore to its shareholders last fiscal year, replacing state-owned miner Coal India as the highest dividend payer in the country.Coal India, which has been the top dividend payer for many years in the past, slipped to second place doling out ₹13,075 crore dividend in the fiscal year 2014-15.Last fiscal year, Tata Sons, which has a stake of 74% stake TCS, was given a dividend ₹11,450 crore, more than twice it earned in the previous fiscal year, 2013-14. The dividend was also slightly more than revenues earned by pharma giant Cipla in FY15.”A significant part of the dividend income earned by Tata Sons gets re-invested in group companies,” a Tata executive told The Economic Times.The dividend payout is expected to give the much-needed financial boost to Tata Sons, as its big units such as Tata Motors and Indian Hotels Company (IHCL) struggle with losses and fail to pay any dividends.Consolidated debt of Tata Motors stood at ₹73,610 crore last fiscal year, the highest among the group companies. Tata Steel has a debt of ₹69,000 crore followed Tata Teleservices with ₹35,000 crore.”Then there are other financial commitments to make, like in Tata Teleservices and Tata Singapore Airlines,” the Tata executive added.With the help of TCS’ dividend, Tata Sons will be able to acquire Docomo’s share in Tata Teleservices. Tata Sons, which is currently embroiled in legal tussle with Japanese Docomo, may require fresh funds worth about ₹12,000 crore to accomplish business needs in the telecom unit.Tata’s new domestic airline Vistara, formed as a result of joint venture between Tata Sons and Singapore Airlines, is yet to make an impact and it also needs funds to better position itself in the intensifying competition in the aviation industry.”Although TCS has been the cash cow for Tata Sons, such high dividend (Rs 79 per share) which includes special dividend (of Rs 40) may not come every year,” said Jagannadham Thunuguntla, head (fundamental research), Karvy Stock Broking.last_img read more

Universities to be held responsible for students activities Edu minister

first_imgeducation minister Nurul Islam NahidUrging the private university vice-chancellors (VCs) to keep their students away from any kind of movement, education minister Nurul Islam Nahid on Wednesday said they should be held accountable for the activities of the students, reports UNB.He made the call while addressing an emergency views exchange meeting with the VCs and pro-vice-chancellors of all private universities at the International Mother Language Institute in the capital.Claiming that the government has already accepted all the nine demands of the students which will be met gradually, Nahid expressed his wonder as to why the private university students staged demonstrations on Monday.”After my meeting with the heads of all educational institutions on Sunday (5 August), students went back to classes. It’s a wonder why students of some private universities staged demonstrations on Monday (6 August). I can’t understand the reason behind their grievances,” he said.The education minister expressed doubt whether the students demonstrated after being instigated by some evil forces.As per the demand of the students, he said, prime minister Sheikh Hasina would soon open work on constructing underpasses in front educational institutions in crowded areas in the city. “Their other demands will also be fulfilled gradually.”Nahid urged the heads of the private universities to make the students understand not to pay heed to any rumour.As the VCs demand unconditional release of students arrested during Monday’s demonstrations, he said actions will be taken as per law against those committed crimes.The education minister, however, said no innocent student will be punished.University Grants Commission (UGC) chairman professor Abdul Mannan chaired the programme jointly organised by the education ministry and UGC.last_img read more

Pencil drawing of a sensor actually is a sensor

first_img More information: Ting-Kuo Kang. “Tunable piezoresistive sensors based on pencil-on-paper.” Applied Physics Letters 104, 073117 (2014). DOI: 10.1063/1.4866440 Using graphite pencils to draw on regular paper, researchers can make some very inexpensive piezoresistive (PZR) sensors. Due to the piezoresistive effect, a sensor’s resistance changes under an applied strain, allowing it to sense mechanical stress and pressure. The first of these pencil-on-paper PZR sensors was fabricated a few years ago as an alternative to silicon PZR sensors, which are costly and require sophisticated fabrication processes. Explore further © 2014 Phys.org. All rights reserved. A pencil-on-paper PZR sensor with an integrated circuit for measuring the sensor’s voltage change under an applied stress. Credit: Kang ©2014 AIP Publishing Journal information: Applied Physics Letters “PZR sensors can be drawn by anyone with a graphite pencil and paper,” Ting-Kuo Kang, a researcher at Cheng Shiu University in Kaohsiung City, Taiwan, told Phys.org. Although graphite PZR sensors are much easier to fabricate than silicon ones, they generally are not as sensitive because graphite’s electrical properties are not as good as those of silicon. In a new study published in Applied Physics Letters, Kang has further investigated the underlying mechanisms of graphite’s PZR properties and improved the sensitivity of graphite-based PZR sensors.PZR sensitivity is characterized by the gauge factor (GF), which is defined as the ratio of the change in electrical resistance to the applied strain. While silicon PZR sensors have GFs above 100, the GFs of graphite PZR sensors are in the single digits.In experiments, Kang used 12 different grades of graphite pencils to draw U-shaped PZR sensors on paper. The pencils are graded by their ratio of graphite to clay. Grades ranged from 9B to 2H, where H denotes the hardness caused by the pencil’s clay content, and B denotes the blackness due to the graphite content. center_img The sensors were drawn on paper that was placed on an electric scale in order to measure and maintain a consistent drawing force for each pencil-drawn sensor. The drawings were then glued on printed circuit board (PCB) strips, and a strain gauge mounted on each PCB strip. Then Kang applied cycles of stress to the sensor using a four-point bending technique, and measured the sensor’s voltage change under the applied stress through an electric circuit. He found that different pencil grades produce different GF values, and therefore different PZR sensitivities. Specifically, the higher the ratio of clay to graphite, the greater the change in resistance under the applied stress, and the greater the GF. Kang explains that these differences can be attributed to variations in the initial tunneling distances between neighboring graphite, with an increase in tunneling distance corresponding to an increase in GF.”The graphite tunneling effect is from one graphite through the insulator of clay to another graphite,” Kang said. “The tunneling structure looks like a metal-insulator-metal.”Currently, PZR sensors made of silicon are used as pressure sensors, accelerometers, and biological sensors, among other applications. As the sensitivity of pencil-drawn graphite PZR sensors continues to improve, they may also be used for these applications. Kang also plans to develop flexible and disposable sensor applications using pencil-on-paper techniques. Citation: Pencil drawing of a sensor actually is a sensor (2014, February 28) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-02-pencil-sensor.html Relationship between relative resistance and applied stress for drawings with different grades of pencils. The differences stem from variations in the initial tunneling distances between neighboring graphite. Credit: Kang ©2014 AIP Publishing Noting tech needs, mining companies seek graphite This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Recipient Moumita dies of infection

first_imgKolkata: Organ recipient Moumita Chakraborty died at SSKM hospital in the wee hours of Monday, three days after a kidney transplant. According to hospital sources, Chakraborty, a resident of Khardah, died at around 2.45 am after her body developed ‘transplant rejection’, a spokesperson from the state Health department said.The woman was kept in ventilation since August 17 after the kidney transplant and her condition gradually deteriorated. It may be mentioned that Chakraborty was one of the recipients of the organs donated by 15-year-old Mallika Majumder, who was declared brain-dead by the SSKM Hospital authorities on August 17. Majumder’s two kidneys and the liver were transplanted on three recipients. Among the three, Chakraborty had undergone a kidney transplant and was admitted to the hospital for her renal problems since the first week of August. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeThe second kidney and her liver were transplanted on two other patients on August 17-18. Sanjib Das of Sodepur in North 24-Parganas received the second kidney. He is presently normal but has been kept under observation. Though he has caught cold, necessary measures have been taken in this regard.”Ajay Nayek from Hyderabad, who has undergone a liver transplant at Apollo Gleneagles Hospitals, is stable now,” the spokesperson maintained.Besides the three organs, Majumder’s cornea was implanted on a blind patient, while her skin was grafted and is being preserved at SSKM’s skin bank. Her heart was found to be clinically unfit for transplantation. Majumder was diagnosed with a space-occupying lesion in the brain after being admitted to the hospital on July 23 and slipped into a coma on August 14. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killedState Tourism minister Goutam Deb visited Majumder’s residence to pay last respects and meet her family members. “This is indeed asad moment but she will be remembered by all for her heroic deed. I am here on behalf of our Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee to pay our last respects. We will always be there for her family and are proud of her,” stated Deb.Mallika’s father Manik, a driver at a courier service company, believes his daughter will continue to live in those who received her organs.last_img read more

For the sheer love of fashion and travel

first_img‘Once upon a Time in Aqua’ – summer festive fashion presentation depicting designer Pranay Baidya’s love for fashion and travel, was held in Kolkata on February 13.The showcase was organised in association with The Park, in the presence of eminent personalities like Tiffany Anderson, Chinni Dragon, Diana Trellor, Corina Poppa, Alexey Idamkin, Fabrice Placon, Jürgen Thomas, Micheal Fiener, Carmen Espinoza, Venus Asawapoom, Dhruv Bhalla, Pradeep Khemka, Nayantara Pal Chowdhury, Nilanjana and Srinjoy Bose, Nilufer Archmant, Shaheb Bhattacherjee, and Koneenica Banshyopadhayay. Also Read – Add new books to your shelf”My wanderlust and gypsy-soul has always inspired the fashion I craft,” said Pranay while speaking on the occasion. In keeping with iconic love stories, the presentation was divided into three dedicated chapters. First one titled ‘From Bankura to Sicily’ had textiles which were lovingly hand printed by skilled artisans offering an alternative to mass produced fast fashion. Also, it aimed at keeping alive the dying art of hand block and silk screen printing in this age of digital printing. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveThe capsule collection featured a bohemian mix of shirt dresses, ruffled maxi dresses and tunics in Sicilian hues of pistachio green, blossom pink, lemon yellow, grotto blue, coral red and marsala. ‘Wanderlust’ Mens Celebration wear – A range of contemporary ethnic-wear separates celebrating equal love, and the belief that in the end love always wins. “The idea is to curate a collection which is impactful yet easy to wear and sparks a dialogue,” mentioned the designer. ‘Inspired by India’ – Womens and Men’s Celebration wear was the third chapter showcasing artisanal printmaking on the lehengas, skirts, sarees and menswear, inspired by mughal miniatures and their exquisite filigree architecture. The showstoppers, Mrs India International Richa Sharma dazzled in an intricately embroidered nude peach Mughal garden inspired organza Lehenga and Amrapali Jewels. Ace directors Nandita Roy was a vision of elegance in a tussar-georgette Benarasi Saree with intricate Pasha motifs woven in Antique gold thread, and Shiboprasad Mukherjee in a Royal Blue Chanderi embroidered kurta ensemble stole all the limelight. The evening witnessed Aqua at The Park transformed into a multilevel destination with models sashaying up to the glass facades encompassing the poolside, brilliantly curated by choreographer and makeup artist Rajat – Kaushik.last_img read more