Nvidia FrameView gives you frame rate bragging rights for any game

first_img Share your voice 17 Photos Now playing: Watch this: 4:22 Post a comment Tags Computers Components Laptops Gaming Desktops The 17 most anticipated video games of 2019 Enlarge ImageThe options available in the beta release of FrameView. Screenshot by Lori Grunin/CNET You can never have too many overlays — that’s got to be someone’s motto. At least Nvidia’s made one that seems pretty useful for trying to figure out why your $800 graphics card is more spud than speed demon. The company’s new FrameView utility could help answer some other questions too: Why cut scenes are rendering as if half the screen is in another time zone, for example. Or why you’re convinced that the Blue Screen of Death must be a feature of the game. FrameView, which has just entered beta testing in conjunction with the launch of its new series of RTX Super cards, can display and capture real-time, as-you-play performance statistics on the lag between the GPU and display. It can also determine what types of frame rates you should be getting, and where GPU and graphics card power-draw spikes (and by implication, possible overheating) might be overwhelming your system’s ability to deal. No extra measurement equipment required. It will even work with AMD cards, though it can’t report the power statistics as granularly because of the way the software works. It’ll need a little help from AMD to tweak the data it reports via its programming interface. I only had a brief chance to give it a whirl — long enough to see that the data it captures may offer some interesting insights. I could see where adaptive sync technologies such as G-Sync and FreeSync may be effective, where frame rates really are tanking and more. It also captures data for random other applications running, as well. It dumped data for the Windows display manager (dwm.exe) and Slack, for example, but not Chrome. The frame rate data is going to need some deeper diving, though, since it didn’t quite jibe with the numbers I got for a quick benchmark run I got from Assassin’s Creed: Odyssey. But beta is beta is beta, so there’s plenty of time to fall down that bottomless data pit. AMD Nvidia Our E3 breakdown: Microsoft’s Project Scarlett looks… 0last_img read more

Pencil drawing of a sensor actually is a sensor

first_img More information: Ting-Kuo Kang. “Tunable piezoresistive sensors based on pencil-on-paper.” Applied Physics Letters 104, 073117 (2014). DOI: 10.1063/1.4866440 Using graphite pencils to draw on regular paper, researchers can make some very inexpensive piezoresistive (PZR) sensors. Due to the piezoresistive effect, a sensor’s resistance changes under an applied strain, allowing it to sense mechanical stress and pressure. The first of these pencil-on-paper PZR sensors was fabricated a few years ago as an alternative to silicon PZR sensors, which are costly and require sophisticated fabrication processes. Explore further © 2014 Phys.org. All rights reserved. A pencil-on-paper PZR sensor with an integrated circuit for measuring the sensor’s voltage change under an applied stress. Credit: Kang ©2014 AIP Publishing Journal information: Applied Physics Letters “PZR sensors can be drawn by anyone with a graphite pencil and paper,” Ting-Kuo Kang, a researcher at Cheng Shiu University in Kaohsiung City, Taiwan, told Phys.org. Although graphite PZR sensors are much easier to fabricate than silicon ones, they generally are not as sensitive because graphite’s electrical properties are not as good as those of silicon. In a new study published in Applied Physics Letters, Kang has further investigated the underlying mechanisms of graphite’s PZR properties and improved the sensitivity of graphite-based PZR sensors.PZR sensitivity is characterized by the gauge factor (GF), which is defined as the ratio of the change in electrical resistance to the applied strain. While silicon PZR sensors have GFs above 100, the GFs of graphite PZR sensors are in the single digits.In experiments, Kang used 12 different grades of graphite pencils to draw U-shaped PZR sensors on paper. The pencils are graded by their ratio of graphite to clay. Grades ranged from 9B to 2H, where H denotes the hardness caused by the pencil’s clay content, and B denotes the blackness due to the graphite content. center_img The sensors were drawn on paper that was placed on an electric scale in order to measure and maintain a consistent drawing force for each pencil-drawn sensor. The drawings were then glued on printed circuit board (PCB) strips, and a strain gauge mounted on each PCB strip. Then Kang applied cycles of stress to the sensor using a four-point bending technique, and measured the sensor’s voltage change under the applied stress through an electric circuit. He found that different pencil grades produce different GF values, and therefore different PZR sensitivities. Specifically, the higher the ratio of clay to graphite, the greater the change in resistance under the applied stress, and the greater the GF. Kang explains that these differences can be attributed to variations in the initial tunneling distances between neighboring graphite, with an increase in tunneling distance corresponding to an increase in GF.”The graphite tunneling effect is from one graphite through the insulator of clay to another graphite,” Kang said. “The tunneling structure looks like a metal-insulator-metal.”Currently, PZR sensors made of silicon are used as pressure sensors, accelerometers, and biological sensors, among other applications. As the sensitivity of pencil-drawn graphite PZR sensors continues to improve, they may also be used for these applications. Kang also plans to develop flexible and disposable sensor applications using pencil-on-paper techniques. Citation: Pencil drawing of a sensor actually is a sensor (2014, February 28) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-02-pencil-sensor.html Relationship between relative resistance and applied stress for drawings with different grades of pencils. The differences stem from variations in the initial tunneling distances between neighboring graphite. Credit: Kang ©2014 AIP Publishing Noting tech needs, mining companies seek graphite This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more