Nvidia FrameView gives you frame rate bragging rights for any game

first_img Share your voice 17 Photos Now playing: Watch this: 4:22 Post a comment Tags Computers Components Laptops Gaming Desktops The 17 most anticipated video games of 2019 Enlarge ImageThe options available in the beta release of FrameView. Screenshot by Lori Grunin/CNET You can never have too many overlays — that’s got to be someone’s motto. At least Nvidia’s made one that seems pretty useful for trying to figure out why your $800 graphics card is more spud than speed demon. The company’s new FrameView utility could help answer some other questions too: Why cut scenes are rendering as if half the screen is in another time zone, for example. Or why you’re convinced that the Blue Screen of Death must be a feature of the game. FrameView, which has just entered beta testing in conjunction with the launch of its new series of RTX Super cards, can display and capture real-time, as-you-play performance statistics on the lag between the GPU and display. It can also determine what types of frame rates you should be getting, and where GPU and graphics card power-draw spikes (and by implication, possible overheating) might be overwhelming your system’s ability to deal. No extra measurement equipment required. It will even work with AMD cards, though it can’t report the power statistics as granularly because of the way the software works. It’ll need a little help from AMD to tweak the data it reports via its programming interface. I only had a brief chance to give it a whirl — long enough to see that the data it captures may offer some interesting insights. I could see where adaptive sync technologies such as G-Sync and FreeSync may be effective, where frame rates really are tanking and more. It also captures data for random other applications running, as well. It dumped data for the Windows display manager (dwm.exe) and Slack, for example, but not Chrome. The frame rate data is going to need some deeper diving, though, since it didn’t quite jibe with the numbers I got for a quick benchmark run I got from Assassin’s Creed: Odyssey. But beta is beta is beta, so there’s plenty of time to fall down that bottomless data pit. AMD Nvidia Our E3 breakdown: Microsoft’s Project Scarlett looks… 0last_img read more

Crafts Store Michaels May Be the Latest Victim of a Data Hack

first_imgJanuary 27, 2014 Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global First, it was Target. Then, Neiman Marcus. Now, Michaels Stores, the arts-and-crafts retailer, has said it may be the latest victim in what is rapidly becoming a string of data hacks targeting retail chains.”We recently learned of possible fraudulent activity on some U.S. payment cards that had been used at Michaels, suggesting we may have experienced a data security attack,” Michaels CEO Chuck Rubin wrote in a letter on Saturday.As of this morning, the magnitude of the breach — the number of consumers affected, the type of information that was compromised, as well as when the attack occurred — remains unclear. Rubin urged consumers to remain “vigilant by reviewing your account statements for unauthorized charges. If you believe your payment card may have been affected, you should immediately contact your bank or card issuer.”Related: Target, Neiman Marcus Credit Card Hacks Could Be More Widespread, Experts SayMichaels’ announcement comes directly on the heels of massive security breaches at Target — where as many as 70 million shoppers’ records were hacked — and Neiman Marcus, where credit and debit card data from upwards of 1.1 million consumers was stolen.And this may just be beginning. Reuters reported that the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation last week warned retailers to expect more attacks and said the agency has reviewed 20 incidents over the past year that were similar to the recent breaches.If Michaels’ customers are indeed affected, the crafts store plans on following Target’s and Neiman Marcus’s lead by offering shoppers free credit monitoring and identity protection.News of the hack couldn’t have come at a worse time for the company, which filed paperwork for a potential public offering of its common stock last month.Related: Target Chief Apologizes as ‘Holiday Hack’ Claims Yet Another Victim Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. 2 min read Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. Register Now »last_img read more