Fords F150 XLT trim can now be had with a diesel engine

first_img The 2019 Ford F-150 gets more power with its luxurious Limited trim Even more ‘Murica: 2019 Ford F-150 Raptor 4:08 2019 Ford F-150 review: Popular pickup keeps on truckin’ 6 7 Photos Now playing: Watch this: 2019 Ford Raptor review: The off-road truck that does it all More From Roadshow Comments Share your voice Ford 2020 BMW M340i review: A dash of M makes everything better Enlarge ImageUntil now, you could only get Ford’s six-cylinder Powerstroke on the F-150’s more luxe trims. Emme Hall/Roadshow When Ford announced that it was going to put a brand-new diesel engine in its F-150 line in its F-150 line, we were excited, as probably were most of you. We got less excited when we found out that this torque-monster of an engine, ideal for doing real work, would only be available in the top Lariat, King Ranch and Platinum trim models.Ford, however, didn’t get to be one of the biggest car companies on Earth by being a bunch of dummies, so it decided to take customer criticism to heart and announced on Thursday that it would add the PowerStroke diesel to the list of available engines on the best-selling XLT trim F-150.”Customers and dealers told us they wanted the diesel on XLT, so we decided to expand the offering,” Dawn McKenzie, truck communications manager for Ford, told Roadshow. “Now, the 3.0-liter Power Stroke diesel will be available on 75% of our offerings, including XLT, which is our most popular series.”What does that mean from a real-dollars standpoint? Well, the base XLT starts at $34,160 while the Lariat trim, before options, goes for $41,700. The King Ranch goes for over $52,000. So it’s a massive reduction in price for someone to get into an F-150 diesel. If you want one, order books are open now. Trucks Diesel Cars Ford Tagslast_img read more

Faulty Update Bricks Nike SelfLacing Smart Shoes

first_img This story originally appeared on PCMag February 21, 2019 Nike’s new basketball smart shoes are apparently bricking due to a faulty firmware update.Android users who bought the Nike Adapt BB are taking to the Google Play Store to complain. “Right shoe won’t connect after update and battery dies within a couple of hours,” reads one review for the Nike Adapt app, which connects to the shoe.”Broke my $350 shoes with a Nike update,” reads another review.It isn’t clear how widespread the problem is for Android users; currently, Google Play shows 18 largely poor reviews for the app, all related to the update issues. But those appeared right after the shoes launched over the weekend.Nike didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment. However, the firmware update problems don’t appear to affect the iOS version of the Nike Adapt app, which has mostly positive reviews.The Nike Adapt BBs have generated hype for the footwear’s self-lacing system. Each sneaker can sense your foot’s measurements and automatically tighten around it as you play a game of basketball for a perfect fit. To do that, this so-called “power lacing” system needs the Nike Adapt app and battery power. Nike plans to issue routine firmware updates to support its cutting-edge basketball shoes, though the updates are intended to be opt-in, Nike said last month.Despite the faulty update, owners can still wear the Nike Adapt BBs without the app, but they’ll just be regular sneakers. To fix the problem, users are reporting you can try initiating a factory reset. One owner managed to resolve the issues by activating the shoes using his wife’s iPhone. This hands-on workshop will give you the tools to authentically connect with an increasingly skeptical online audience. Free Workshop | August 28: Get Better Engagement and Build Trust With Customers Now 2 min read Enroll Now for Freelast_img read more

Facebook open sources Sonar their crossplatform debugging tool

first_imgFacebook has announced the open-source release of Sonar, their cross-platform debugging tool. Sonar is designed to aid developers, framework experts and engineers collaborate on the app development process. Sonar is built on Facebook’s Stetho, an Android debugging bridge built on Chrome’s developer tools. Sonar further adds more extensible features to Stetho such as plugins to help engineers develop new features, investigate bugs and optimize apps. Sonar is a cross-platform debugging tool. Hence developers can connect their mobile devices ( Android and iOS or an emulator) to a desktop client for inspection. Sonar works as a guide and interpreter to a running app providing developers with stats on what an app is doing to better understand bugs and system capabilities. Sonar is now available for the developer community at large, not just Facebook engineers, as an open-source software project via GitHub. As Sonar was designed with extensibility in focus, it made use of a lot of external plugins. With the open sourcing of Sonar, these plugins are also being open-sourced. Some of these include: Logs, a plugin that shows device logs without the need for additional setup. Layout Inspector, a debugging platform that provides deep dives into user interface hierarchies and supports Litho and ComponentKit components. Network, a plugin that enables the inspection of network packets as they pass into and out of the app in question. Sonar architecture Sonar’s architecture has two parts, a desktop client, and a mobile SDK. The desktop client is built on top of Electron, and Facebook’s projects such as React.js, Flow, Metro, RSocket, and Yarn. The mobile SDK is installed within the Android or iOS application and interacts with the desktop client. The mobile SDK makes use of Facebook open source projects such as Folly and RSocket. Plugins are available for both Desktop client and Mobile SDK. Desktop client plugins render the UI and a mobile SDK plugin exposes the data. A React component extends the desktop plugin class. This React component is in charge of communicating with the mobile SDK plugin and rendering any data it delivers. The mobile SDK plugin is developed in the language native to the platform on which it will run ( Swift/Objective-C on iOS or Java/ Kotlin on Android). It registers a set of handlers and defines responses for them. Source: Facebook Blog Emil Sjölander, Facebook software engineer hopes that “open-sourcing Sonar and the accompanying plugins will provide a useful tool for other engineers working on mobile applications.” He says that “As we’ve already seen Sonar prove useful internally at Facebook, we think Sonar’s APIs will help other engineers build great new experiences to improve their workflows.” You can read about the full release coverage on Facebook code blog. Read Next Jest 23, Facebook’s popular framework for testing React applications is now releasedFacebook’s F8 Conference – 5 key announcementsTesting Single Page Applications (SPAs) using Vue.js developer toolslast_img read more

The Ember project announces version 34 of Emberjs Ember Data and Ember

first_imgYesterday, the Ember project announced the release of version 3.4 of the three core sub-projects: Ember.js, Ember Data, and Ember CLI. Ember is an open source JavaScript frontend framework, which is based on Model-View-Viewmodel (MVVM) pattern. It enables developers to create scalable single-page web applications by incorporating common idioms and best practices into the framework. Ember.js 3.4 Ember.js 3.4 is an incremental, backward compatible release of Ember with bug fixes, performance improvements, and minor deprecations. Angle bracket invocation You can now use angle bracket invocation instead of the classic invocation syntax. For example: Instead of using the following syntax: Source: Ember You can use: Source: Ember This release does not deprecate the classic invocation syntax, but using angle bracket invocation will provide more syntax clarity. As component invocation is often encapsulating important pieces of UI, a dedicated syntax would help visually distinguish them from other handlebars constructs, such as control flow and dynamic values. Custom Component Manager This version comes with the new Custom Component Manager feature enabled by default. This allows addon authors to access a low-level API for creating component bases classes which addon users can re-use and extend components from. Deprecations Use closure actions instead of sendAction When using sendAction, the developer passes the name of an action. When sendAction is called, Ember.js would look up that action in the parent context and invoke if it exists. This poses a few problems, such as: The action is looked up only when it is about to be invoked. This makes it easier for a typo in the action’s name to go undetected. When you use sendAction you cannot receive the return value of the invoked action. Closure actions solve these problems and are also more intuitive to use. Ember 2 Legacy This is the last version that will work with the polyfill addon for features that were deprecated in 2.x. If you have been using ember-2-legacy, it’s time to upgrade. Ember Data 3.4 Ember Data is the data-persistence library that provides many of the facilities of an object-relational mapping (ORM). Ember Data 3.4 is the first Ember Data LTS release. This release has received a ton of bug fixes to address many known issues that have been reported over the last several months. Some of them are listed here: TrackableRequests for when async leakage is detected. This feature enables app developers to better use async… await while simultaneously detecting asynchronous test leaks in their data layer. External partner testing is now enabled to run the tests of external apps and addons against commits in ember-data. Transpilation issues with @ember/ordered-set are fixed. Tests are added for createRecord+unloadRecord. ember-inflector is upgraded to v3.3.0. Added module-unification adapter and adapter-test blueprints. Ember CLI 3.4 Ember CLI is the command line interface to create, develop, and build Ember.js applications. Ember CLI 3.4 is an LTS release candidate. It will receive critical bug fixes for the upcoming 6 release cycles, as well as security patches for the next 10 release cycles. Added support for Node 10 Support has been added for Node 10 and support for Node 4 has been dropped from Ember CLI’s support matrix. When upgrading to Ember CLI 3.4, make sure to use it together with Node 6 and above. Template linting Automatic template linting is added to your application via ember-template-lint according to the recommended list of rules. Ember CLI will generate a TemplateLint test file for each of your templates to your test suite automatically to be run via ember test. To run the linter you can also use the new command npm run lint:hbs or yarn run lint:hbs respectively. Read the full list of changes on Ember’s official website and also check out its GitHub repository. Read Next Ember project releases v3.2.0 of Ember.js, Ember Data, and Ember CLI Getting started with Ember.js – Part 1 Getting started with Ember.js – Part 2last_img read more

How Deliveroo migrated from Ruby to Rust without breaking production

first_imgYesterday, the Deliveroo engineering team shared their experience about how they migrated their Tier 1 service from Ruby to Rust without breaking production. Deliveroo is an online food delivery company based in the United Kingdom. Why Deliveroo decided to part ways from Ruby for the Dispatcher service? The Logistics team at Deliveroo uses a service called Dispatcher. This service optimally offers an order to the rider, and it does this with the help of a timeline for each rider. This timeline helps in predicting where riders will be at a certain point of time. Knowing this information allows to efficiently suggest a rider for an order. Building these timelines requires a lot of computation. Though these computations are quick, they are a lot in number. The Dispatcher service was first written in Ruby as it was the company’s preferred language in the beginning. Earlier, it was performing fine because the business was not as big it is now. With time, when Deliveroo started growing, the number of orders increased. This is why the Dispatch service started taking much longer than before. Why they chose Rust as the replacement for Ruby? Instead of writing the whole thing in Rust, the team decided to identify the bottlenecks that were slowing down the Dispatcher service and rewrite them in a different programming language (Rust). They concluded that it would be easier if they built some sort of native extension written in Rust and make it work with the current code written in Ruby. The team chose Rust because it provides high performance than C and is memory safe. Rust also allowed them to build dynamic libraries, which can be later loaded into Ruby. Additionally, some of their team members also had experience with Rust and one part of the Dispatcher was already in Rust. How they migrated from Ruby to Rust? There are two options using which you can call Rust from Ruby. One, by writing a dynamic library in Rust with extern “C” interface and calling it using FFI. Second, writing a dynamic library, but using the Ruby API to register methods, so that you can call them from Ruby directly, just like any other Ruby code. The Deliveroo team chose the second approach of using Ruby API, as there are many libraries available to make it easier for them, for instance, ruru, rutie, and Helix. The team decided to use Rutie, which is a recent fork of Ruru and is under active development. The team planned to gradually replace all parts of the Ruby Dispatcher with Rust. They began the migration by replacing with Rust classes which did not have any dependencies on other parts of the Dispatcher and adding feature flags. As the API of both Ruby and Rust classes implementation were quite similar, they were able to use the same tests. With the help of Rust, the overall dispatch time was reduced significantly. For instance, in one of their larger zones, it dropped from ~4 sec to 0.8 sec. Out of these 0.8 seconds, the Rust part only consumed 0.2 seconds. Read the post shared by Andrii Dmytrenko, a Software Engineer at Deliveroo, for more details. Read Next Introducing RustPython, a Python 3 interpreter written in Rust Rust 1.32 released with a print debugger and other changes How has Rust and WebAssembly evolved in 2018last_img read more