Facebook owns Instagram and WhatsApp and plans to make that obvious

first_img Facebook Tags Originally published Aug. 2, 3:31 p.m. PT.Update, 3:47 p.m.: Adds information about where the rebranding will appear. Share your voice Mobile Tech Industrycenter_img Facebook said Friday that it plans to rebrand Instagram and WhatsApp.  Angela Lang/CNET Facebook plans to rebrand Instagram and WhatsApp so users know they’re from the social network, a move that highlights how the company is exerting more control over its acquisitions. The apps will say “Instagram from Facebook” and “WhatsApp from Facebook.””We want to be clearer about the products and services that are part of Facebook,” Bertie Thomson, a Facebook spokeswoman, said in a statement Friday. She said the change is currently rolling out slowly and more and more users will start to see the rebranding. The rebranding will appear on Instagram’s and WhatsApp’s login screens and in app store descriptions for the two apps, Thomson said. The Information, which earlier reported the rebranding, cited three people familiar with the matter and said some employees are surprised and confused about the upcoming change.Facebook, which has been dealing with a series of privacy and security scandals, allows Instagram and WhatsApp to operate independently and the apps don’t bear the Facebook name. But the apps are also going to become more intertwined with one another in the future. The social network is trying to make it possible for users who use Facebook Messenger, Instagram direct message and WhatsApp to send messages to each other without having to switch apps.Though Facebook purchased both apps years ago, many consumers don’t know the social network owns both Instagram and WhatsApp. The change comes as the Federal Trade Commission is investigating Facebook over antitrust concerns. The FTC is looking into whether Facebook’s purchases of companies such as Instagram and WhatsApp were part of a strategy on the part of the social media giant to stifle competition, according to a report this week from The Wall Street Journal. Post a comment 0last_img read more

Paleoecologists suggest mass extinction due to huge methane release

first_img Global warming led to atmospheric hydrogen sulfide and permian extinction © 2010 PhysOrg.com Explore further (PhysOrg.com) — Micha Ruhl and colleagues from the University of Copenhagen’s Nordic Center for Earth Evolution have published a paper in Science where they contend that the mass extinction that occurred at the end of the Triassic period, was due to a “sudden” increase in the amount of methane in the atmosphere due to the effects of global warning that resulted from the spewing of carbon dioxide from volcanoes. Citation: Paleoecologists suggest mass extinction due to huge methane release (2011, July 22) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-07-paleoecologists-mass-extinction-due-huge.html More information: Atmospheric Carbon Injection Linked to End-Triassic Mass Extinction, Science 22 July 2011: Vol. 333 no. 6041 pp. 430-434 DOI:10.1126/science.1204255ABSTRACTThe end-Triassic mass extinction (~201.4 million years ago), marked by terrestrial ecosystem turnover and up to ~50% loss in marine biodiversity, has been attributed to intensified volcanic activity during the break-up of Pangaea. Here, we present compound-specific carbon-isotope data of long-chain n-alkanes derived from waxes of land plants, showing a ~8.5 per mil negative excursion, coincident with the extinction interval. These data indicate strong carbon-13 depletion of the end-Triassic atmosphere, within only 10,000 to 20,000 years. The magnitude and rate of this carbon-cycle disruption can be explained by the injection of at least ~12 × 103 gigatons of isotopically depleted carbon as methane into the atmosphere. Concurrent vegetation changes reflect strong warming and an enhanced hydrological cycle. Hence, end-Triassic events are robustly linked to methane-derived massive carbon release and associated climate change. Prior to this research, most scientists have believed that the sudden extinction of nearly half of all life forms on the planet was due solely to the emissions from volcanic eruptions that were occurring in what was to become the Atlantic Ocean. Ruhl et al contend that instead, what happened, was that the small amount of atmospheric heating that occurred due to the exhaust from the volcanoes, caused the oceans to warm as well, leading to the melting of ice crystals at the bottom of the sea that were holding on to methane created by the millions of years of decomposing sea life. When the ice crystals melted, methane was released, which in turn caused the planet to warm even more, which led to more methane release in a chain reaction, that Ruhl says, was the real reason for the mass extinction that led to the next phase in world history, the rise of dinosaurs. Ruhl and his team base their assertions on studies they’ve made of the isotopes of carbon in plants (found in what is now the Austrian Alps) that existed during the period before the mass extinction. In so doing they found two different types of carbons and the molecules that were produced during that time frame. After extensive calculations, Ruhl and his team came to the conclusion that some 12,000 gigatons of methane would have had to have been pumped into the atmosphere to account for the differences in the isotopes; something the team believes could only have happened if the methane were to come from the sea floor.This new research, though dire sounding, may or may not have implications for modern Earth. While it is true that humans have pumped significant amounts of carbon into the atmosphere, amounts that are approaching what Ruhl and his team say led to the earlier methane release, it doesn’t necessarily mean we are on the same path, because as Ruhl points out, things are much different today, the very structure of the planet has changed so much that it would be impossible to transfer what might have been learned about events in Earth’s history 200 million years ago, to what is going on today. This wide angle view of the Earth is centered on the Atlantic Ocean between South America and Africa. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

MIT professor creates reality TV series of his daily life

first_img Major cities must unite against climate change: Paris mayor © 2017 Phys.org Citation: MIT professor creates reality TV series of his daily life (2017, March 27) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-03-mit-professor-reality-tv-series.html Shot from In My Shoes. Credit: Cesar Hidalgo (Phys.org)—”What if the Kardashians were physicists?” asks César Hidalgo, an associate professor at MIT and director of the Collective Learning group at the MIT Media Lab.center_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Fortunately they’re not, but that odd-sounding blend might be the best way to imagine Hidalgo’s new project: a video series called “In My Shoes” that documents his professional life as a researcher and his personal life as a husband and father of a young daughter. The final product—eight episodes ranging in length from 10 to 20 minutes—can be viewed at https://www.inmyshoes.info. “The goal of the series is to help show younger people considering an academic career what the day-to-day of the life of a scholar is like,” he said. “Personally, I think that this would have been very useful to me 20 years ago, when I was considering an academic career but had no role models in Chile.”Hidalgo self-recorded his life over the course of three months in 2016. During that time, he traveled extensively—from Boston to Washington, D.C.; Saudi Arabia; Switzerland; Portland; Monterrey; and Paris. One of the major projects that Hidalgo was working on at the time was DataUSA, a website that presents all kinds of data (economic, demographic, health, education, housing, etc.) in a visual, rapidly digestible way. It’s intended to provide information for policymakers, business owners, students, and job-seekers.The video series, however, is not intended to inform us of the technical details of such projects. Instead we get an inside look at what’s it like to actually be the person developing and sharing these projects, complete with all of the thoughts and concerns that any ordinary person would have. Hidalgo’s narration is thoughtful, entertaining, modest, and—when it comes to what jet lag feels like after 24 hours of travel—painfully sincere. It’s a unique and personal perspective of the academic life that breaks down the traditional stereotypes—especially as we learn that even MIT professors find it challenging to dress a two-year-old in the morning. Explore furtherlast_img read more