300000 Students To Benefit From School Feeding Project

first_img Recommended for you Bahamas DPM Turnquest, as IDB Governor, Talks Technology and Climate Change Resilience at IDB Conclave Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppKINGSTON, Sept. 10 (JIS): Over 300,000 students are expected to benefit from an integrated school feeding project, to be implemented by the Government. Titled: ‘Strengthening of School Feeding Programmes in the Framework of Latin America and the Caribbean without Hunger 2025 Initiative’, the project involves collaboration among the Ministries of Health; Agriculture and Fisheries; and Education.It aims to strengthen the Government’s existing school feeding programme by, among other things: ensuring adequate nutrition for students through increased access to affordable nutritious, safe, and quality foods in schools; and establishing and maintaining a comprehensive school feeding national policy, plan, and legislation.This integrated school feeding project model has recorded significant success in Brazil, where it has been undertaken over the past 50 years. Brazil’s government, along with the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), are partnering with Jamaica to implement the initiative, for which a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) formalizing the arrangement, is to be signed by the major stakeholders.At the launch on Tuesday (September 9), at the Planning Institute of Jamaica’s (PIOJ) New Kingston offices, Education Minister, Hon. Rev. Ronald Thwaites, said its implementation will ensure that children, particularly at the early childhood level, have access to adequate nutritious meals each day, thereby fortifying their development.“We know that in that first 1,000 days (of a child’s life), and beyond, to perhaps grade eight, is the time of brain formation, or personality development, when nutrition plays a tremendously important role,” he said. He stated that the “knowledge… of the Brazil model of school feeding will be of inestimable opportunity for us in Jamaica. This is exactly the kind of cooperation we need for Jamaica, and I trust that the information that will be purveyed, will not only be a fillip to the local economy, but, also, be a tremendous strength to the process of education.” In his remarks, Acting Agriculture and Fisheries Minister, Hon. Derrick Kellier, said the initiative is integral to “our holistic drive for the National Food Security and Nutrition Programme.”“If we wish to have a nation that is healthy, then we must ensure that our young children are properly fed and, from the earliest stages, be involved in pursuing a healthy lifestyle. Therefore, our educational, health, and agricultural policies and programmes must be crafted and implemented in such a way as to enhance convergence and collaboration to ensure the best outcomes,” he stated.“It is for this reason that the Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries is fully committed to ensuring the supply of more nutritious and locally grown foods throughout the nation, specifically in the school feeding programme,” Mr. Kellier assured.Health Minister, Hon. Dr. Fenton Ferguson, gave the Ministry’s commitment to playing its part to achieve the goals that have been outlined in the (project) MoU.”In his remarks, FAO’s representatives to Jamaica, Belize, and the Bahamas,Dr. Jerome Thomas, said that school feeding programmes are important in promoting food and nutrition security in countries where they exist.“They also impact on the implementation of public policies for the achievement of the right to food. For these reasons, school feeding programmes are, therefore, recommended as one of the major strategies for addressing long-term sustainable development,” he added.PIOJ Director General, Colin Bullock, said the project represents an important partnership between regional governments and the Government of Brazil, supported by the FAO, while Charge d’Affaires at the Brazilian Embassy in Jamaica, Alfonso Nery, said his Government welcomes the opportunity to share the key components of its school feeding programme with Jamaica.Key among the project’s initial engagements is a two-day workshop, being conducted by visiting Brazilian school feeding experts, for 45 participants from several government ministries, departments, and agencies, at the PIOJ, which commenced on September 8.The workshop’s participants also include representatives from Antigua and Barbuda, and St. Lucia, where similar programmes are slated for implementation. Following the workshop, the participants will receive additional training, which will run until December 16.Brazil boasts one of the world’s most successful school feeding programmes in the world. Managed by the National Fund for Educational Development (FNDE), Brazil’s programme currently provides nutritious food to more than 45 million children across the South American nation, through integrated public policy development and implementation with other government sectors. Brazil’s involvement in Jamaica’s project forms part of the Government’s commitment to South-South cooperation, particularly with Caribbean countries. Jamaica’s Senate Begins debate on National Identification and Registration Bill Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Related Items:Education Minister, Hon. Rev. Ronald Thwaites, jamaica, school feeding program Two boys die, bicycle and van collide in St. Catherine, Jamaicalast_img read more

Manchester City De Bryune cant stand losing games

first_imgManchester City midfielder Kevin De Bruyne says he can’t stand losing, either on the football pitch or playing a board game at home with his family.The Citizens host Wolverhampton Wanderers on Monday night, hoping to close in on Liverpool’s seven-point lead at the top of the Premier League standings.De Bruyne is expected to start the game against Nuno Espirito Santo’s side after an injury-blighted season which has seen him restricted him to just six league appearances.Pep Guardiola’s men are looking to become the first Premier League side to successfully defend the title since Sir Alex Ferguson’s Manchester United team in 2009.Premier LeaguePremier League Betting: Match-day 5 Stuart Heath – September 14, 2019 Going into the Premier League’s match-day five with a gap already beginning to form at the top of the league. We will take a…City defeated Liverpool 2-1 in their last Premier League outing and will be hoping for another win when Wolves come visiting.De Bruyne was asked what motivates him, the Belgium international, replied, as quoted by the Independent:“Winning. I can’t stand to lose.”“Even at home, playing boards game with the missus, the son, whatever, I can’t lose against them. It’s just the way I am. It just drives me to keep going and to become probably the best I can be in football.”last_img read more

Nvidia FrameView gives you frame rate bragging rights for any game

first_img Share your voice 17 Photos Now playing: Watch this: 4:22 Post a comment Tags Computers Components Laptops Gaming Desktops The 17 most anticipated video games of 2019 Enlarge ImageThe options available in the beta release of FrameView. Screenshot by Lori Grunin/CNET You can never have too many overlays — that’s got to be someone’s motto. At least Nvidia’s made one that seems pretty useful for trying to figure out why your $800 graphics card is more spud than speed demon. The company’s new FrameView utility could help answer some other questions too: Why cut scenes are rendering as if half the screen is in another time zone, for example. Or why you’re convinced that the Blue Screen of Death must be a feature of the game. FrameView, which has just entered beta testing in conjunction with the launch of its new series of RTX Super cards, can display and capture real-time, as-you-play performance statistics on the lag between the GPU and display. It can also determine what types of frame rates you should be getting, and where GPU and graphics card power-draw spikes (and by implication, possible overheating) might be overwhelming your system’s ability to deal. No extra measurement equipment required. It will even work with AMD cards, though it can’t report the power statistics as granularly because of the way the software works. It’ll need a little help from AMD to tweak the data it reports via its programming interface. I only had a brief chance to give it a whirl — long enough to see that the data it captures may offer some interesting insights. I could see where adaptive sync technologies such as G-Sync and FreeSync may be effective, where frame rates really are tanking and more. It also captures data for random other applications running, as well. It dumped data for the Windows display manager (dwm.exe) and Slack, for example, but not Chrome. The frame rate data is going to need some deeper diving, though, since it didn’t quite jibe with the numbers I got for a quick benchmark run I got from Assassin’s Creed: Odyssey. But beta is beta is beta, so there’s plenty of time to fall down that bottomless data pit. AMD Nvidia Our E3 breakdown: Microsoft’s Project Scarlett looks… 0last_img read more

Boston Dynamics Atlas shows balance WildCat sprints untethered w Video

first_img © 2013 Phys.org DARPA’s ATLAS robot unveiled (w/ Video) The feat is a tribute to the company’s control system for the robot. The demo shows how Atlas can stay upright using kinematic and load data from its sensors. Commenting on his reaction to seeing Atlas stay balanced despite being hit by the ball, Noel Sharkey, professor of artificial intelligence and robotics at the University of Sheffield, told the BBC it was “an astonishing achievement” and “remarkable feat.” Next on the engineering agenda is to give Atlas an articulated head with stereo cameras and a laser range finder, along with sensate hands capable of using tools. More information: www.bostondynamics.com/index.html Legged Squad Support System (LS3) is a four-legged robot designed to travel 20 miles on rough terrain carrying 400 lbs of load. The video shows field testing at Twentynine Palms, CA. Testing includes rough-terrain mobility, endurance, visually guided following, GPS guided maneuver, and overall reliability. LS3 is being developed by Boston Dynamics with funding from DARPA and the US Marine Corps. The company’s history dates back to when it was a spinoff from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where Marc Raibert and colleagues developed animal-inspired robots. They founded the company in 1992. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further Atlas is part of the DARPA Robotics Challenge Program. The robot is tethered, powered from an off-board, electric power supply. Atlas’ reason for being is to serve as a humanoid robot that will be capable enough to move in outdoor, rough terrain. The limbs need to perform well, to be able to lift, carry and manipulate in rough environments. Atlas was unveiled in July at the company, as a robot that can respond to dangerous emergencies.The video shows the Atlas robot now on rough terrain walking with bent knees and arms stretched, on rubble and rocks, maintaining its balance as it moves along. In another scene, a ball is trying to knock it over as Atlas stands on one foot, maintaining its balance even while standing on one leg and being hit by the ball from the side. WildCat is a four-legged robot being developed to run fast on all types of terrain. So far WildCat has run at about 16 mph on flat terrain using bounding and galloping gaits. The video shows WildCat’s best performance so far. This month, Boston Dynamics also posted a video of its WildCat robot, funded by DARPA and developed for emergency response and aid scenarios, in a public outing beyond and free from indoor treadmills. The big news about WildCat is that, unlike its robotic cousin Cheetah, this quadruped is untethered. Cheetah drew attention for its speed; the robot could run at 28 miles per hour but that was on a treadmill indoors tethered to a power supply. WildCat can sprint and gallop unrestrained at 16 miles per hour outside of the lab. The video shows its capabilities. (Phys.org) —Boston Dynamics, the Waltham, Massachusetts robotics company that receives funds from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), is making more video news. Whether the company turns out videos of intros and updates of robots such as BigDog, or Petman, or Cheetah, its animal- and human-inspired robots promptly make the rounds of dozens of news sites and blogs. The company has made these robots interesting works in progress, as we see them, from development phase to phase, advancing in balance, agility, speed and strength. This month’s video hits from Boston Dynamics show the company’s two tests, for its bipedal Atlas and its quadruped WildCat. Citation: Boston Dynamics: Atlas shows balance; WildCat sprints untethered (w/ Video) (2013, October 8) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-10-boston-dynamics-atlas-wildcat-sprints.htmllast_img read more

Pencil drawing of a sensor actually is a sensor

first_img More information: Ting-Kuo Kang. “Tunable piezoresistive sensors based on pencil-on-paper.” Applied Physics Letters 104, 073117 (2014). DOI: 10.1063/1.4866440 Using graphite pencils to draw on regular paper, researchers can make some very inexpensive piezoresistive (PZR) sensors. Due to the piezoresistive effect, a sensor’s resistance changes under an applied strain, allowing it to sense mechanical stress and pressure. The first of these pencil-on-paper PZR sensors was fabricated a few years ago as an alternative to silicon PZR sensors, which are costly and require sophisticated fabrication processes. Explore further © 2014 Phys.org. All rights reserved. A pencil-on-paper PZR sensor with an integrated circuit for measuring the sensor’s voltage change under an applied stress. Credit: Kang ©2014 AIP Publishing Journal information: Applied Physics Letters “PZR sensors can be drawn by anyone with a graphite pencil and paper,” Ting-Kuo Kang, a researcher at Cheng Shiu University in Kaohsiung City, Taiwan, told Phys.org. Although graphite PZR sensors are much easier to fabricate than silicon ones, they generally are not as sensitive because graphite’s electrical properties are not as good as those of silicon. In a new study published in Applied Physics Letters, Kang has further investigated the underlying mechanisms of graphite’s PZR properties and improved the sensitivity of graphite-based PZR sensors.PZR sensitivity is characterized by the gauge factor (GF), which is defined as the ratio of the change in electrical resistance to the applied strain. While silicon PZR sensors have GFs above 100, the GFs of graphite PZR sensors are in the single digits.In experiments, Kang used 12 different grades of graphite pencils to draw U-shaped PZR sensors on paper. The pencils are graded by their ratio of graphite to clay. Grades ranged from 9B to 2H, where H denotes the hardness caused by the pencil’s clay content, and B denotes the blackness due to the graphite content. center_img The sensors were drawn on paper that was placed on an electric scale in order to measure and maintain a consistent drawing force for each pencil-drawn sensor. The drawings were then glued on printed circuit board (PCB) strips, and a strain gauge mounted on each PCB strip. Then Kang applied cycles of stress to the sensor using a four-point bending technique, and measured the sensor’s voltage change under the applied stress through an electric circuit. He found that different pencil grades produce different GF values, and therefore different PZR sensitivities. Specifically, the higher the ratio of clay to graphite, the greater the change in resistance under the applied stress, and the greater the GF. Kang explains that these differences can be attributed to variations in the initial tunneling distances between neighboring graphite, with an increase in tunneling distance corresponding to an increase in GF.”The graphite tunneling effect is from one graphite through the insulator of clay to another graphite,” Kang said. “The tunneling structure looks like a metal-insulator-metal.”Currently, PZR sensors made of silicon are used as pressure sensors, accelerometers, and biological sensors, among other applications. As the sensitivity of pencil-drawn graphite PZR sensors continues to improve, they may also be used for these applications. Kang also plans to develop flexible and disposable sensor applications using pencil-on-paper techniques. Citation: Pencil drawing of a sensor actually is a sensor (2014, February 28) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-02-pencil-sensor.html Relationship between relative resistance and applied stress for drawings with different grades of pencils. The differences stem from variations in the initial tunneling distances between neighboring graphite. Credit: Kang ©2014 AIP Publishing Noting tech needs, mining companies seek graphite This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more